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Metro Youth to Hear FirstHand Accounts from the Civil Rights Era | People

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Metro Youth to Hear FirstHand Accounts from the Civil Rights Era
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Metro Youth to Hear FirstHand Accounts from the Civil Rights Era

Lithonia, GA--  Ousley United Methodist Church Youth Ministry opens its doors on the third Friday of Black History Month, Friday, February 18, 2010, 6 p.m. to host presentations by Rev. Jane Gunter and Samuel L. Price, individuals for whom the highs and lows, tragedies and triumphs of the Civil Rights era constituted their daily lives.  Metro-Atlanta youth are invited to hear firsthand accounts of an historic time in American history.

In keeping with the theme for Black History Month 2011—“How We Got Over: Educating, Encouraging and Empowering for Change”—as the presenters share their personal experiences, young people will see and hear firsthand, the pivotal role played by young people in moving the Civil Rights Movement forward. This understanding could then be the catalyst empowering them to be agents of positive change in their generation.

While a youth event, family members of all ages are encouraged to attend these captivating, educational and empowering presentations. The event is free. For the convenience of all attending the event, the Ousley United Methodist Youth Ministry will make available a spaghetti dinner for a donation of $4. Dinner will be served at 6 p.m. Presentations begin at 7 p.m.

Rev. Jane Gunter, a native of Atlanta, was living in Montgomery in 1955 as a young Air Force bride. She happened to be on the bus when Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white person and went on to have a personal relationship with Ms. Parks. As she shares her experiences, and the challenges and emotions of those days, Rev. Gunter will also share her faith journey.

Samuel L. Price was on military leave when Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was trying to get to Selma, Alabama to participate in a march organized by the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). With no one available to take Dr. King to Selma, Price volunteered to transport him to Selma, making it possible for Dr. King to be part of that march. Mr. Price will share his observations and involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

 

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